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I am hosting reviewer. I post articles about hosting companies. I have tried too many hosting companies then i wrote the reviews.

Wednesday, June 04, 2008

A php hosting Artilce for Your Viewing

Today's php hosting Article

To check and more and to get some demos of both the output and admin interfaces be sure to check out� They have tons of examples from every corner of the blogging, CMS and forum world.� One of the best database out there if you are looking for a better alternative to WordPress.

Washington Nationals Mascot

Wed, 21 May 2008 14:52:23 -0800 posted a photo:

Washington Nationals Mascot

We encountered "Screech", the Washington Nationals mascot in the elevator.

Instead of launching your hosting business to wait for traffic to convert into hosting clients, you can take a completely different approach. You can use ethical email marketing and compile a list of targeted possible hosting clients. You can even purchase such an email list from reputable companies. However this latter option needs to be handled with a lot of care because many list companies claiming to be reputable are actually the very opposite.

Customization vs Standardization, or What Amazon and Rackshack Have in Common

Tue, 27 Feb 2007 23:27:00 -0400

In early 2001, just a few months before Exodus filed for bankruptcy, Robert Marsh launched Rackshack. Unlike his struggling competitors, who typically built servers to spec, Robert sold $99 Cobalt RaQs. Only one configuration was available, and orders were provisioned instantly and automatically. And instead of demanding multi-year commitments, Rackshack offered month to month service. By the time I joined the company in early 2003, Rackshack (which later changed its name to EV1Servers) had become the world's largest dedicated server provider.

A year or so later, Robert unveiled EV1's private racks program during a customer gathering; two attendees signed up on the spot. Soon other orders starting pouring in, along with complicated network diagrams and super detailed server specs from customers who wanted their systems built just so. We did our best to accommodate any and all requests, which were a huge challenge to keep track of. Only much later did I learn about ITIL from Rich Bader over at EasyStreet. By that time, Amazon had already launched S3 and would soon introduce EC2.

Unlike EV1's Custom Order team, who gladly built whatever customers asked, EC2 sells only $0.10 virtual server instances. There's just one configuration available, and orders are provisioned instantly and automatically. Instead of demanding month-long commitments, Amazon offers pay-as-you-go service in 1 hour units.

According to Vinne Marchanadi from Deal Architect, pay-as-you-go is what large customers nowadays are looking for. (A former Gartner analyst, Vinnie now advises enterprise IT buyers on vendor selection.) He offers the analogy of plugging into an efficient power source versus buying fancy generators. On behalf of his clients, he says:

"Message to vendors - so long as you meet our security, privacy and compliance standards, we want as vanilla, standardized a service as possible. Sell us capacity by unit of consumption. We want to leverage all your economies - in financing, procurement, operations, everything. In return, we want to fit as much as possible in to your standards."

Another couple of years from now, will standardization again give way to customization? I think the answer is yes. And no. Amazon recently started offering Machine Image sharing. And VMWare's virtual appliance marketplace features about 400 listings. And offers over 500 partner apps on AppExchange. And earlier this month Netvibes unveiled its universal widget API... It seems service delivery platforms will become more - not less - standardized, while each user will have increasing freedom to mix and match a wide range of interoperable applications into highly customized solutions. Doesn't that sound like the best of both worlds?

Did you know that the Web Hosting Show was Yakov Smirnoff’s favorite way to spend a lazy afternoon? Ok, maybe that isn’t true but I will update you on the rise of the Soviet Union domain name extension as well as pull the curtain other myths and rumors about SEO. Now just as long as Yakov’s lawyers don’t shut me down, the Web Hosting Show is on the air.


Tue, 12 Feb 2008 18:11:08 +0000
Moniker Online Services, LLC ( is a leading provider of domain name registration, management, and monetization services for individuals and businesses that wish to have a unique address and branded identity on the Internet. Domain names serve as part of the infrastructure for Internet communications, including Web sites, email, audio, video and telephony.
As one of ...]

What Graphics Editor do you use?

Maximizing Your Mindshare (and Wallet Share) in the New World of SaaS

Thu, 01 Mar 2007 15:11:00 -0400

I really like SMBLive CEO Matt Howard's way of looking at software as a service. (Some argue that we should start calling it software enabled service.) Matt says running a business is all about maintaining "5 conversations": with oneself, co-workers, external partners (vendors/contractors/distributors), customers and the general public. So ideally, web apps should facilitate personal productivity,
collaboration, vendor management, CRM and sales/marketing.

Traditionally, hosting providers have focused on helping customers maintain a web presence - which only fulfills 20% of the functionalities Matt describes. So I thought it was pretty awesome when Barbara Branaman mentioned that Concentric is in the process of integrating its new collaboration service with its clustered hosting and email solutions. I said the unified offering should help Concentric increase mindshare. Barbara said also importantly, it will boost wallet share. The goal is to earn a larger slice of more customers' IT budgets.

Barbara will need to keep a close eye on Google, whose Apps Premier cover about half of the 5 conversations. Remember last December's headlines about Microsoft battling Gmail for corporate workers' attention? It seems Redmond faces an even tougher challenge with respect to productivity apps: Ars Technica reported yesterday that Google Docs and Spreadsheet account for a 92% share of unique visitors, and 95% of the amount of time spent. I'm not impressed with Google Pages, but Blogger is pretty popular. I'm sure sooner or later both will be rolled into Google Apps, along with Google Base.

Meanwhile, have you heard about eBay's new partnerships with ERP/CRM provider NetSuite (spotted via Mark Crofton's blog) and popular social network Bebo? And SalesForce is looking to build a "circle of success" around its CRM app; David Berlind says their odds are decent.

Earlier David Snead asked via a comment on an earlier post whether easy interoperability between different vendors' apps will obviate the need for hosting providers to customize services for any audience. Based on Rodney Loges' experience, I think the answer is no.

Rodney (who was instrumental in digitalNATION's $100 million sale to Verio as well as Rackspace's launch of its Intensive service) has transformed his company from a web development firm into a SaaS provider by assembling a suite of best-of-breed content management, web analytics, collaboration, etc, tools for associations and non-profits. Each hand-picked application meets specific requirements that his customers share. I think that's what it takes to win in SaaS/SES - of which hosting is just a small percent. In other words, the key is customer segmentation.

Today`s suggestion:

The hosting service works fine, although we have a very low volume of traffic
(less then 500mb a month). Unfortunately, from time to time, every few days, our
email would stop arriving. We wouldn't actually loose any mail, but email would
be delayed by as much as an hour sometimes. We complained about this to
ixwebhosting a few times through their online live chat help. No resolution
came, even though I even contacted them at the moment when our email was NOT
working - so they could experience the problem as well during 'live chat' help.
Later I recieved an email saying that they tested our email, and that we have no
problem and that ticket has been 'resolved' (not!). Just like every previous
time. They know it is an intermittent problem and they check once in a blue moon
and based on that conclude that everything is fine. So email problems stay
unresolved. Too bad, it seemed like a good deal and a good place for one's
hosting needs.

Click Here to go to ixwebhosting

Writing is something that has to be enjoyed. And with php hosting, we have indeed enjoyed writing all that we know about it. We wish you also enjoyed yourself.

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